Journal Watch

  1. To stop PD catheter migration: location, location, location

    The “real estate” used for PD catheter placement matters in preventing catheter tip migration, a study finds. Compared to 98 people who received conventional left quadrant PD catheter placement, 139 whose catheters were placed in the right lower quadrant had significantly less catheter tip migration (19.3% vs. 3.6%; P<0.01) with similar inflow and outflow time, ultrafiltration volume, infection, hemorrhage, and obstruction rates.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/11/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  2. On PD, less inflammation linked with longer survival

    Among 87 people on PD, ages 30-85, who were followed for 30 months, the inflammation marker serum amyloid-A (SAA) was a significant independent predictor of mortality. When four markers of inflammation were analyzed together, SAA, age, and the presence of cerebrovascular insults were the strongest predictors.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/11/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  3. More reasons to use PD fluid with less sugar

    Using a novel index created by dividing the glucose content of PD solution by body weight, this study looked at the impact of PD fluid sugar on hemoglobin A1c, fluid overload, and inflammation (measured by interleukin (IL) 6) in 43 people on PD. Higher sugar levels were linked with worse diabetes control, more fluid overload, and higher IL-6 levels.

    Read the abstract » | (added 03/11/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  4. Nocturnal home HD catheter sepsis rates similar to in-center

    When 63 nocturnal home HD patients with catheters were matched 1:20 with standard in-center HD patients, both groups had similar rates of sepsis. The catheters lasted about the same length of time.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Home Dialysis, Hemodialysis

  5. How patients and care partners feel about home HD

    A review of 24 qualitative studies of home HD patients and care partners found five themes: feeling vulnerable, fear of being alone, concerns about family burden, opportunity to thrive, and appreciating medical responsiveness. Starting home HD seemed to be an especially anxious time. Acknowledging these themes and offering reassurance may help more people succeed on home HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Home Dialysis, Hemodialysis

  6. Bioartificial kidney challenges

    When Shuvo Roy is an author on a bioartificial kidney review paper, you know it is worth reading. Cell-based therapies are an approach to duplicate all of the functions of a healthy kidney, including hormone production. But, where the cells come from, organ scaffolding, and immune response remain challenges even in animals—let alone humans.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  7. FHN finding: Frequent and/or Nocturnal HD lowers blood pressure

    In the Frequent Hemodialysis Network trials, those randomized to short daily HD had systolic BP an average of 7.7 points lower than those in the standard HD group. Diastolic BP came down an average of 3.9 points. Fewer BP meds were needed. Those who did nocturnal HD had systolic BP an average of 7.3 points lower, and diastolic an average of 4.2 points lower.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Nocturnal Hemodialysis, Hemodialysis

  8. PD training: How much is enough to reduce peritonitis risk?

    In a group of 2,243 patients from Brazil, two thirds with less than 4 years of education, training time mattered. After nearly a year of follow up, those whose training was less than 1 hour per session were more likely to have peritonitis. And, those who had at least 15 hours of training had significantly less peritonitis than those who had less. Having a care partner or training multiple people did not affect the risk. But, training before the catheter was placed or at least 10 days after did help.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  9. PD training: How much is enough to reduce peritonitis risk?

    In a group of 2,243 patients from Brazil, two thirds with less than 4 years of education, training time mattered. After nearly a year of follow up, those whose training was less than 1 hour per session were more likely to have peritonitis. And, those who had at least 15 hours of training had significantly less peritonitis than those who had less. Having a care partner or training multiple people did not affect the risk. But, training before the catheter was placed or at least 10 days after did help.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  10. More Canadian patients use PD if their nephrologists place catheters

    Among 3,886 people with CKD in Ontario and had a PD catheter placed, those whose nephrologists put in the catheter were 59% more likely to use PD. Even among those who did not end up doing PD, when a nephrologist placed a PD catheter, survival was 97%—vs. 73% when a radiologist put in the catheter.

    Read the abstract » | (added 02/10/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis