Journal Watch

  1. Home HD is cost-effective vs. in-center

    A review of six studies of dialysis costs between 2000 and 2014 found that contemporary home HD options (short daily HD and nocturnal HD) may have higher short-term costs, but offer long-term cost savings compared to in-center HD, due to lower staff costs and better health outcomes.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  2. HD recovery time predicts survival (DOPPS)

    In a finding with important implications for longer and/or more frequent HD, 6,040 in-center HD patients in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) were asked “How long does it take you to recover from a dialysis session.” The shorter the recovery time, the lower the risk of hospitalization and death.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  3. A metaanalysis of vitamin D in PD

    PD patients tend to have lower vitamin D levels than HD patients. A review of 40 studies (of 1,036 patients) found that besides decreasing PTH levels (in nearly all cases), vitamin D supplements were linked with reducing proteinuria, a lower peritonitis risk, and less loss of peritoneal protein. The authors speculate that optimizing vitamin D levels may help preserve residual renal function.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  4. Ferritin levels may predict residual renal function (RRF) drop on PD

    Besides being an iron storage protein, ferritin is also a marker of inflammation. In a new study from Korea, the ferritin levels and RRF were measured in 123 people on PD. Those whose ferritin levels were high (>250 ng/mL) had significantly greater loss of RRF than those with lower ferritin levels. Multiple linear regression pointed to ferritin levels as an independent risk factor.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  5. Fine-tuning fluids with bioimpedance may save lives on PD

    A study of 529 PD patients tracked between 2008 and 2012 using a Body Composition Monitor found that overhydration (OH) is lethal. Patients in the top 33% for OH had an 83% higher risk of death. Body mass index (BMI) was not a factor.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  6. For older patients, PD offers quality of life boost

    Compared to younger people, those over age 65 on PD reported better quality of life, even after adjustment for case mix and comorbidities. Levels of anxiety and depression were about the same between older and younger patients. Those who used a cycler for PD reported fewer symptoms. The authors conclude that “Patients across different age groups should be given non-biased information about both peritoneal dialysis modalities and individual preferences should be elicited and carefully considered by healthcare providers.”

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  7. Should PD catheters be fixed in place?

    PD catheters that migrate may need to be moved or replaced. In a new study from Japan, 16 patients had the usual PD catheter placement, and 25 had their catheters placed using a fixation technique. The fixed catheters were far more likely to be in the right position, and less likely to move out of position. Complication rates were similar for both groups.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  8. Home HD: Flexibility, control, and independence

    In-depth interviews with 24 home HD patients in New Zealand found that dialysis was disruptive in terms of the body and the time it takes—but also a positive experience on many levels, especially the way people relate to others.

    Read the abstract » | (added 07/07/2014)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  9. Fewer hospital days with home HD

    Is home HD really better—or does it just look better because younger, healthier people choose to do it? Researchers looked at hospital days of 25 people on home HD vs. 25 standard in-center HD patients who were healthy enough to be on the transplant list. Across the group, home HD patients spent 71 days in the hospital, and standard in-center HD patients spent 85 (P<0.005). The authors concluded that this study “confirms the superiority of the HHD treatment option in improving patient outcomes.

    Read the abstract » | (added 07/07/2014)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  10. First-year outcomes of incident US PD patients

    Among 1,677 incident PD patients from Fresenius, 367 switched to HD within the first 90 days. Of those who continued with PD, first-year mortality was 10 per 100 patient-years, with 42 episodes of peritonitis and 128 hospitalizations per 100 patient-years. About 2/3 of the hospitalizations occurred in the first 6 months of PD therapy. Of those who switched to HD, 81.4% began treatment with a central venous catheter—and 78.3% still had one 90 days later.

    Read the abstract » | (added 07/07/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis