Journal Watch

  1. Education can change negative nurse attitudes toward home dialysis

    In-center HD nurses tend to prefer…in-center HD. But, their negative attitudes toward home treatments can be modified, a new study shows. In Canada, a 3-hour educational session with CE credits on the benefits of home treatments, myths about patient eligibility, costs, and a testimonial video did the trick.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/09/2015)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  2. Home hemodialysis needs you! Special Kidney International supplement.

    A special supplement of Kidney International focuses on how to implement home hemodialysis, from policies and procedures to equipment, recruitment, safety, prescription, staffing, and more—from global experts. Don't miss it!

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/09/2015)

    Tags: Hemodialysis, Home Dialysis

  3. Gene therapy via nanoparticles reduces peritoneal fibrosis in mice

    Gene therapies may reduce peritoneal fibrosis—a leading cause of PD failure. Delivering transforming growth factor using nanoparticles worked in a mouse study.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/09/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  4. Dosage of Tamiflu® for people on PD

    A new study finds that a single, 75mg dose of oseltamivir may be enough for people on PD who don’t have residual kidney function. The more residual function people had, the more efficiently the drug was removed—so more was needed for an optimal response.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/09/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  5. Glucose challenge test (GCT) detects glucose metabolism disorders in PD

    When glucose-based PD fluid is used, it can be a challenge to see if there are blood sugar issues. In 20 people on PD who did not have a history of diabetes, an initial GCT detected impaired glucose tolerance in eleven and diabetes mellitus in four. About 2 years later, twelve patients had glucose metabolism disorders—but none had diabetes.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/09/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  6. New index more accurate than Kt/V for PD “adequacy”

    It’s no secret that we at Home Dialysis Central are not fans of Kt/V for HD (or the concept of “adequacy”). A new European study suggests that Kt/V is not useful for PD, either (because it does not account for protein intake), and has tested a substitute index that works better.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/09/2015)

    Tags: Hemodialysis, Home Dialysis

  7. Ultrasound can measure peritoneal wall thickness in children

    Fibrosis of the peritoneum can cause PD failure. But, peritoneal wall thickness can be measured with a painless ultrasound. The results can assess whether the peritoneum is changing over time.

    Read the abstract » | (added 05/09/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  8. Maximum ultrafiltration rate as a measure of optimal HD

    Dialysis removes both wastes and water. Yet, while we have measures for waste removal, we have no marker for water—even though, in the short run, it is more important for patient health and well-being. Dr. Agar proposes a maximum ultrafiltration rate.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/10/2015)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  9. Nurses may be a barrier to extended in-center HD treatments

    In a UK study to assess the feasibility of recruiting patients for a trial of 6-hour HD vs. 4-hour, 56 nurses were polled about their attitudes. While 95% of national non-nurse healthcare providers felt that the longer treatments were clinically helpful, just 42% of nurses agreed. And, while 75% of the non-nurses felt that longer HD treatments were well-tolerated, only 45% of nurses thought so—while 83% of nurses were concerned about the impact of the longer treatments on scheduling shifts.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/10/2015)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  10. Daily HD – fewer hospital days and less dropout than PD

    Compared to PD patients in the USRDS, 1,116 people who did daily home HD had significantly fewer hospital days (5.2 vs. 9.2) and were significantly less likely to switch back to standard in-center treatment (15% vs. 44%). Hospital rates for daily home HD were about the same as those for standard in-center HD in this study.

    Read the abstract » | (added 04/10/2015)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis