Journal Watch

  1. Are portable or wearable kidney devices on the horizon?

    Nanotechnology may allow for a new generation of wearable and portable devices to treat kidney failure. Some are now in large animal and human trials. A new day may be coming.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/07/2014)

    Tags: Chronic Kidney Disease

  2. Older patients may make less informed options decisions

    In a study of 99 people on dialysis in North Carolina, those who were over age 65 reported significantly less informed decision making. They were less likely to say that the doctor had explained their health problems, and more likely to feel that the doctor made a choice for them.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/07/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis, Hemodialysis

  3. mTOR inhibitors may treat encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis

    In a case study report, a class of drugs that includes Rapamycin (sirolimus) was used to successfully treat a 16 year old who developed EPS after a switch from PD to HD. mTOR inhibitors help keep new blood vessels from growing.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/07/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis, Hemodialysis

  4. Short-term transfer from PD to HD was not harmful

    Peritonitis may require a switch to HD for a while. Does this affect patient or technique survival? No, finds an Australian study that looked at 8 years of people new to PD and matched PD-to-HD-and-back switchers to those who stayed just on PD or HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 11/07/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis, Hemodialysis

  5. Nocturnal home HD boosts hemoglobin level and reduces ESA use

    Every other night nocturnal home HD (NHHD) was compared to standard in-center HD in a small study. Among the 23 people using NHHD, Hemoglobin increased by about 2 g/dL after 2 years (P<0.001), while ESA dose dropped by just over 50% (P<0.001), and 26% were able to stop ESAs. Among the 25 people doing standard HD, hemoglobin levels dropped by almost 2 g/dL (P = 0.007), and ESA dosage increased (P<0.001).

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/07/2014)

    Tags: Home Dialysis, Hemodialysis, Nocturnal Hemodialysis

  6. Home therapies: Better outcomes

    A review article suggests that outcomes for PD and home HD are as good—or better—than those for standard in-center HD. PD use in the US has grown after the Medicare bundle created an incentive for its use. Home therapies are effective and patient-centered treatments.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/07/2014)

    Tags: Home Dialysis

  7. Biocompatible PD fluid may preserve long-term residual kidney function

    A metaanalysis of 11 studies (n=1,034) found that biocompatible PD fluid did not boost residual kidney function (RKF) in the short term. But, at 12 months or more, there was a long-term preservation of RKF.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/07/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  8. Self-locating catheters (SLC) vs. straight Tenckhoff catheters for PD

    Which is better to reduce complications: an SLC designed to avoid trapping the tip against the abdomen wall? Or, a single cuff, straight Tenckhoff catheter? In a series of 78 people new to PD, 40 were given SLCs and 38 were given Tenckhoffs. Prior to the start of PD, there were no differences between the groups. But, once PD began, there were fewer problems in the SLC group (p=0.021). Plus, it was easier to solve problems with SLCs using laxatives, and no surgeries were needed.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/07/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  9. PD catheter tunnel and exit site infections more likely with poor glycemic control—but not peritonitis

    Diabetes is known to raise the risk of infection. A study that looked back at blood sugar levels of 183 people new to PD, those with poor glycemic control had almost twice as many catheter tunnel and exit site infections, and had a first infection much sooner (p = 0.004). But, there was no increase in the risk of peritonitis.

    Read the abstract » | (added 10/07/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  10. Home HD access survey

    A survey of consumers and clinicians on vascular access practices for home HD found that nurses were not following their own training procedures or using generally accepted procedures (GAP) to cannulate—and consumers were reluctant to report some signs and symptoms of access infection. Not one nurse or consumer had followed all of the GAP steps. (Editor’s note: This may help explain the high—and preventable—infection rate reported with the Buttonhole technique...)

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/05/2014)

    Tags: Hemodialysis