Journal Watch

  1. Home HD access survey

    A survey of consumers and clinicians on vascular access practices for home HD found that nurses were not following their own training procedures or using generally accepted procedures (GAP) to cannulate—and consumers were reluctant to report some signs and symptoms of access infection. Not one nurse or consumer had followed all of the GAP steps. (Editor’s note: This may help explain the high—and preventable—infection rate reported with the Buttonhole technique...)

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/05/2014)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  2. VOLUME FIRST to improve outcomes in people on HD

    We try to include only HOME dialysis abstracts—but when the Chief Medical Officers of most of the US dialysis clinics agree on key messages to improve care, we need to summarize their four key points. These are: (1) Normalizing extracellular fluid volume should be a primary goal of dialysis. (2) Fluid removal should be gradual and treatments should not routinely be less than 4 hours. (3) Keep dialysate sodium in the range of 134-138 mEq/L and avoid routine sodium modeling and hypertonic saline. (4) Counsel consumers to avoid salt in their diets.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/05/2014)

    Tags: Home Dialysis

  3. Home HD in people over age 65

    As MEI has noted in our MATCH-D tool, age alone should not be a contraindication for home PD or HD—and a new study shows this. In an international, multi-center study of 79 people over age 65 at dialysis initiation, event-free survival on home HD was 85% at 1 year, 77% at 2 years, and 24% at 5 years, with technique survival of 92%, 83%, and 56%, respectively. Just over half (54%) needed a helper for home HD.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/05/2014)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  4. Men on PD fare worse with high serum uric acid levels

    In a study of 985 people using PD in China followed for more than 2 years, men in the highest tertile for serum uric acid were at the highest risk of death. The results were adjusted for age; BMI; comorbidities; residual kidney function; total Kt/V; use of allopurinol, ACE-inhibitors and ARBs; Hgb, serum albumin, creatinine, calcium and phosphorus, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/05/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  5. Tolvaptan may boost urine output for people on PD

    A drug called tolvaptan nearly doubled the average urine volume and reduced the need for PD fluid volume by about 5000 mL weekly in a small trial of 11 people. The medication did not affect Kt/V, serum sodium, or serum albumin.

    Read the abstract » | (added 09/05/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  6. Home HD is cost-effective vs. in-center

    A review of six studies of dialysis costs between 2000 and 2014 found that contemporary home HD options (short daily HD and nocturnal HD) may have higher short-term costs, but offer long-term cost savings compared to in-center HD, due to lower staff costs and better health outcomes.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  7. HD recovery time predicts survival (DOPPS)

    In a finding with important implications for longer and/or more frequent HD, 6,040 in-center HD patients in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) were asked “How long does it take you to recover from a dialysis session.” The shorter the recovery time, the lower the risk of hospitalization and death.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Hemodialysis

  8. A metaanalysis of vitamin D in PD

    PD patients tend to have lower vitamin D levels than HD patients. A review of 40 studies (of 1,036 patients) found that besides decreasing PTH levels (in nearly all cases), vitamin D supplements were linked with reducing proteinuria, a lower peritonitis risk, and less loss of peritoneal protein. The authors speculate that optimizing vitamin D levels may help preserve residual renal function.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  9. Ferritin levels may predict residual renal function (RRF) drop on PD

    Besides being an iron storage protein, ferritin is also a marker of inflammation. In a new study from Korea, the ferritin levels and RRF were measured in 123 people on PD. Those whose ferritin levels were high (>250 ng/mL) had significantly greater loss of RRF than those with lower ferritin levels. Multiple linear regression pointed to ferritin levels as an independent risk factor.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis

  10. Fine-tuning fluids with bioimpedance may save lives on PD

    A study of 529 PD patients tracked between 2008 and 2012 using a Body Composition Monitor found that overhydration (OH) is lethal. Patients in the top 33% for OH had an 83% higher risk of death. Body mass index (BMI) was not a factor.

    Read the abstract » | (added 08/04/2014)

    Tags: Peritoneal Dialysis